Archive for the ‘homeless’ Category

Do you know one of these?

If anyone is qualified to make this statement, Christopher Reeve is! On May 27, 1995, Reeve was left quadriplegic after being thrown from a horse during an equestrian competition in Virginia, in the USA. He now requires to use a wheelchair and a portable ventilator for the rest of his life.

But heroes don’t always come with such obvious obstacles to overcome, or appear to have the strength required to overcome what seem like insurmountable challenges. Heroes can be people like you and me. Heroes can be the person who says hello to a lonely neighbour; the friend you calls late at night just to check you’re ok; the stranger who stops and gives a homeless person food and water.

Anyone who makes a difference in someone else’s life is a true real-life hero. Are you being a hero to someone today?

When you see a homeless person sitting or lying in the street, what do you do? Do you go and speak to them, go any buy them some food, or keep walking and look the other way?

Why do we ‘look the other way” when we see people in need? Is it because we think if we pretend we haven’t seen them we can deny all responsibility?

Sadly there are mange homeless people and people in need all over the world. We can’t go on pretending we haven’t seen them, can we?

What is home?

Posted: February 12, 2018 in Food, homeless, life, poverty, prayer
Tags: ,

When we think of home, I guess most of think of the following:

  • A roof over our head
  • A place where we can eat
  • Electricity
  • A bed where we can sleep
  • Heat
  • A place of safety
  • A place of love

These may be things we can take for granted sometimes, so today, can I urge you to stop and pray for a few minutes, and thank God for each of these things which together make our house our home.

Sadly for many these days, some of these things may be missing from their house – maybe they can’t afford to heat their home, or buy food; maybe there are those that live in their home who frighten or hurt them, so it’s not a place of love.

So please pray for those less fortunate than use – For those who live in a home where there is no love, or pain and suffering is just part of daily life for them. They need our prayers.

MerryChristmas

I’m not sure how many people will read this blog post as it’s Christmas day and most will busy with your family, eating, giving and receiving gifts, and celebrating Christmas. But if you are reading this let me wish you a very happy and blessed Christmas!

Christmas is time for family and friends, joy and celebration, but is it that for everyone? Sadly there will be many today who are alone, mourning the loss of a love one who have passed away or homeless. There are also those who may have thire family with them, but didn’t have enough money to buy any gifts or even buy a meal for them today.

So today as you celebrate, I ask you to take a few minutes out from your celebrations and pray for those who are finding today very difficult.

Enjoy your Christmas, and enjoy making new memories with your family today.

Merry Christmas!

In a world where people are scared to reach out and help others in case someone gets the wrong idea; where people don’t trust anyone they don’t know; and  where people don’t trust anyone who doesn’t share the same beliefs or religion as them; I want you to think about whether you would stop and help, or run and ignore in the following situations:

  1. You’re driving along a road in your car. There’s a couple of other cars about and you see only one or pedestrians at most. Then you notice a pedestrian walking along the pavement suddenly collapses to the ground for no apparent reason…What do you do stop and help or run and ignore?
  2. You’re in a busy supermarket at the checkout. There’s a young mother in front of you with a child who seems to be pushing the mother’s patience to it limits. When the checkout assistant tells the mother how much her shopping comes to, she realises she’s £2’s short of the money she needs… Do you offer to pay the £2 for her, or do you pretend you didn’t here the conversation the mother was having with the checkout assistant?
  3. You’re walking through a busy shopping area and come across a young child crying their eyes out, and they seem  to be on their own…Do you approach the child and ask them if they are ok, or if they’ve lost their mum or dad, do you go find an official from one of the shops to come and help, or do you just keep walking sure that the child ‘will be ok’?
  4. A homeless person sitting on a local street asks you if you can spare some money for some food…Do you give them some money, go buy them some food and take it back to them, or just ignore them and keep walking?
  5. You find a £20 note lying in an aisle of a shop…Do you hand it into the customer service desk in the shop, or do you pocket the money hoping no-one saw you?

What were your answers? Were they honest answers?

If you’re answers aren’t what they should be, I hope that next time you find yourself in that situation, you stop and think for a moment, and then make what is ‘the right’ decision.

Following on from Saturday’s post Too Scared, I feel it’s appropriate to share the following:

Just as I asked each of us to take time to talk to the homeless, today I’m asking each of us to go that one step further…to got to extremes to help them.

If they were our family or friends, we’d go to extremes to help them, so why not the homeless – In God’s eyes they are brothers and sisters, so let’s treat them that way.

I recently read this article on the bbc news site and found it a hard read – It was quite upsetting and it really challenged me to consider how I treat homeless people.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-42003888

Yes, I’ve stopped and given a few coins to some homeless people sometimes; Yes, I’ve also bought a sandwich and a drink for a few as well; But have I ever really taken time to speak to them? My honest answer is, no I haven’t – Just like two-thirds of other Scots, I haven’t taken the time to stop and engage in conversation with a homeless person.

I was recently in Glasgow city centre during the day for the first time in a while, and must admit to being quite shocked and saddened by the number of people sitting/lying out in the streets homeless, on what was a chilly morning.

Who am I to judge these people, as just like me they are human beings! The difference been them and me is they have lost everything, including all hope. What can be worse than losing all hope and having no-one to talk to?

Why do we feel afraid to speak to homeless people? What reasons do we have to feel afraid of them? Personally I think it’s probably just another sad indictment of how society is these days – The fact that the article on the bbc website states that younger people are less likely to stop and help homeless people does seem to confirm this.

What has our world become, that we aren’t willing to try to help those at their lowest?

Let’s take time to help anyone who needs help, regardless of whether they are our friend, a neighbour, a colleague, someone we meet in the street or a homeless person.

Last week as I was driving along some of my local streets and was aware that there were a number of unwanted items piled up outside quite a few of the houses. At first I was wondering what was going on, but soon remembered that it in my area it was ‘uplift day’. i.e. the day that our local council collect items we no longer want, and take them to the tip for us.

My main thought was why are people “throwing out” items that appeared to be in pretty good condition, when they could be reused by someone else – Items included several sofas, a couple of tables and chairs, and a wardrobe.

One thing we’ve always done when replacing/renewing items in our home is to recycle items which are in reasonable condition – There is a local community church which helps rehouse refugees, so we know all items we give them will get put to good use. Places like our local church, are always delighted to take items that are in reasonable condition as they are inundated with requests for help, so are always in need of items.

I wonder why these people near me hadn’t considered giving their items away to help people in need, but instead were happy to pay the local council to take away their items to dump in a landfill site.

Just think how many more people could be rehoused and given items for their home if we all gave our unwanted items to organisations who help refugees and homeless people!

Did you know that the bible tells us to recycle?

And when they had eaten their fill, he told his disciples, “Gather up the leftover fragments, that nothing may be lost.” (John 6:12)

So next time you have unwanted items in your home, please consider contacting a local organisation who can make sure your items are given to people who need them.

 

 

When someone asks you where your home is we normally answer with the location of where we live don’t we?

home-sweet-homeHome should mean a place of safety and security, but sadly for many, if they do not have a place where they can feel safe and secure, even although they have what most of us would call a home.

Unfortunately there are also many who do not have a roof over their head, a home where they can feel safe, and so have to sleep on the streets or if their lucky, they find a bed in a shelter for a night.

For those of us who do have a home where we feel safe and secure, I suspect, like me, you probably take it for granted much of the time. Maybe we need to remember more often how fortunate we are to have a home, and in doing so think of those who are less fortunate than us.

Central heating is great when it’s working.

heating-repairCentral heating not working means it’s cold inside in winter.

Cold makes us shiver and snivel.

Cold means we put extra layers of clothing on.

Can the heating be fixed?

Could it be costly?

Can we face another day in the cold?

 

Consider those who never have central heating or even a home.

Cold all the time, no roof over their head to call a home.

Change your thoughts from your own broken heating and instead pray for those who don’t have no place they can call home.

homeless