Posts Tagged ‘customer’

An old one but just as true today as it was when I first saw it many years ago:

One of these days customers will be able to explain in Plain English what they actually want. And maybe on that day, the analyst might understand Plain English, so they build a usable solution that the customer actually wanted and still needs.

Happy designing 🙂

Speak properly, and in as few words as you can, but always plainly; for the end of speech is not ostentation, but to be understood. ~ William Penn

The project I’m responsible for at work just now, involves designing and developing a new website to provide our customers with a simple, and easy to understand way of communicating with us. This includes ensuring that the information/text the customer will be presented with is written in Plain English. i.e. It is written with the reader in mind, using non-technical terms that are clear and concise in meaning.

To give us the best chance of ensuring that what we are developing is written in way our customers will understand, we’ve held several customer forums, and have completed some online training provided by the Plain English Campaign (www.plainenglish.co.uk). For those who have not heard of the Plain English Campaign, here’s an extract from their website explaining their purpose:

Since 1979, we have been campaigning against gobbledygook, jargon and misleading public information. We have helped many government departments and other official organisations with their documents, reports and publications. We believe that everyone should have access to clear and concise information.

From the customer forums we held, we quickly realised that some of the words/terms we frequently use when we communicate with our customers, are either unclear or meaningless to our customer. This got me thinking about how we as Christians, and Salvationists, communicate God’s message to the people we come into contact with.

Do we use words that others won’t understand?

Do we use abbreviations or jargon that those unfamiliar with the Salvation Army will not know or understand?

I think most of us, if we’re honest, would answer ‘Yes’ to both those questions. But we’re not alone, even Jesus found at times he had to simplify his language so that the disciples understood what he was trying to tell them!

In John 16:25-29, we read:

“I’ve used figures of speech in telling you these things. Soon I’ll drop the figures and tell you about the Father in plain language. Then you can make your requests directly to him in relation to this life I’ve revealed to you. I won’t continue making requests of the Father on your behalf. I won’t need to. Because you’ve gone out on a limb, committed yourselves to love and trust in me, believing I came directly from the Father, the Father loves you directly. First, I left the Father and arrived in the world; now I leave the world and travel to the Father.”

His disciples said, “Finally! You’re giving it to us straight, in plain talk—no more figures of speech. Now we know that you know everything—it all comes together in you. You won’t have to put up with our questions anymore. We’re convinced you came from God.”

There are many people all around us: in our church; in our communities; our school; places of employment etc, who all need Christ. So just as Jesus had to speak plainly so the disciples understood and believed He was the Son of God, maybe we too need to review how we communicate God’s message to others, so they will believe in God.

There are people living in the world out there…
They need you, they need me, they need Christ;
There are children crying and no one to care…
They need you, they need me, they need Christ.
And they’ll go on hurting in the world out there,
And they’ll go on dying, drowning in despair,
And they’ll go on crying, that’s unless we care:
They need you, they need me, they need Christ.

Customer Care

Posted: July 12, 2010 in life
Tags: , , , , , ,

One day last week at work after I parked my car, I went into the newsagent shop just along the road from my office to get a bottle of water. When I entered the shop the woman behind the counter was talking to another one of the staff who was obviously checking stock and between them they seemed to be working out what they needed to stock up on.

I got a bottle of water from the fridge and went to the counter to pay for it. When I went to the counter the two folk from the shop continued their discussions about their stock requirements, stopping briefly just long enough to inform me I owed £1.05 for my bottle of water, and then started talking to her colleague again while I got the correct change from my purse.

I handed over the exact money for my water which was promptly taken from me and put in the cash register while continuing her conversation with her colleague! I put my purse back in my handbag said “Thank you” and left the shop having got no reply.

I felt as though I had been an inconvenience to the woman behind the counter. They were trying to determine what they needed to order and I had the nerve to go into their shop and want to buy something! This was definitely not the level of customer care I expect from any shop, especially not one wish is presents itself as a friendly local newsagent.

Since that day, I have made a point of buying my bottles of water etc from a different newsagent – it’s like night and day at my new newsagent compared with the one I previously frequented.

Just a wee reminder to all the folk out there who have to deal with customers:

  • remember that without your customers you’ll have no business!
  • a smile is priceless
  • saying please and thank you costs nothing but means a lot